Young Entrepreneurs in Starkville gather to Barter and Sell

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In Starkville, MS, young entrepreneurs barter and sell their handmade goods at the annual Kids Fair. It's a fun experience that allows the children to learn the value of their work as well as skills needed for bartering.

Starkville Annual Kids Fair

by: Rylie Livingston
published: April 29, 2018

STARKVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) – Some area children are taking action to make their own money.

Kids in Starkville came together to show that adults aren’t the only ones who can be entrepreneurs.

Booths everywhere you look with young entrepreneurs working to get people to buy their homemade products.

Slime, bubbles, and wood crafts were some of the items up for sale.

It’s all a part of the annual Kids Fair in Starkville.

“The kids fair is a chance for kids to become entrepreneurs,” said Alison Buehler. “They start their own little businesses and then sell what they have created, and they think about it for months about what made money last year, and they try to improve on it. So they make more money this year, and then they get to keep their money, but mostly they spend it at the other kid’s booths.”

Buehler’s children’s desire to make more money is what sparked her idea for the event that kicked off four years ago.

“I had three kids and they were always wanting to make money they always had you know. We didn’t live in a neighborhood where they could do lemonade stands and so I thought it taught a good skill for them and it’s fun,” said Buehler.

This young entrepreneur is back again this year promoting her product.

“It was a fun experience and it was, it was fun getting to sell my own stuff and have people coming and buying it,” said Liah Jones.

Carolyn Carr is a mother of two of the young entrepreneurs.

She says the kids aren’t only making extra cash, but they’re also learning important skills.

“The main benefit is working with the people,” said Carr. “Not only adults and children but they learn to barter and trade. They learn how much time it takes to put into the products that they create and they learn how much that money is really worth when they go to sell it or barter with other children.”

There were around 50 participants at the event.

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